Kieferorthopädie Dr. Jos van den Hoek | Bern - Düdingen

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

Frequently asked questions about orthodontic treatments

1. What are the benefits of orthodontic treatments?

2. When should the first examinations be made in children?

3. Can adults also undergo orthodontic treatment?

4. Must I still wear "braces" as an adolescent or adult?

5. How long do orthodontic treatments last?

6. Are orthodontic treatments painful?

7. Who bears the cost of orthodontic treatment?

8. What happens at the end of orthodontic treatment?

 

1.  What are the benefits of orthodontic treatments?

Orthodontic treatments have both functional and aesthetic indications. Correct positioning of the jaw and good tooth position with corresponding interlocking are a necessary prerequisite for ideal function during chewing, swallowing, speaking and for correct mouth closure and breathing. Beautiful teeth and good tooth position let us laugh in a relaxed manner and increase self-esteem.

2. When should the first examinations be made in children?

It is advisable to have children undergo an orthodontic examination initially at 6 to 8 years old. Many orthodontic problems can be corrected more easily and better in children, before the growth of the jaw slows down. Early start of treatment can also mean that costlier measures can be avoided. Individual treatments need a lot of time and above all sufficient jaw growth. If the start of treatment is too late, under certain circumstances, the problems can no longer be ideally solved, or, at best, only in combination with oral surgery measures.

3. Can adults also undergo orthodontic treatment?

It is never too late for orthodontic treatment in adults. There are also patients of pensionable age undergoing orthodontic treatments. Especially in adults there is the option of invisible or barely visible treatment, for example by means of Lingualtechnik or Aligner. Orthodontic problems relating to tooth position can be corrected just as well in adults as in children. Complicating factors, such as the absence of jaw growth, possibly require the planning of special treatment. In adults, absence of jaw growth, possible gum and bone loss in the periodontium (periodontal disease) and worn, damaged and missing teeth may require certain adaptations to the type and result of treatment.

4. Must I still wear "braces" as an adolescent or adult?

Nowadays, there are various different options for invisible and/or hardly visible treatment. These include e.g. Lingualtechnik, in which the braces are applied to the lingual (tongue side) of the teeth, Aligner, transparent plastic aligners, or transparent or tooth-coloured braces. 

5. How long do orthodontic treatments last?

The duration of treatment varies from case to case. Simpler corrections of tooth position can often be completed within 6 to 12 months. More complex orthodontic cases, e.g. also using various orthodontic appliances, may take several years. Treatments often last 2 to 3 years.

6. Are orthodontic treatments painful?

Orthodontic treatments are among the less painful treatments in dentistry and are minimally invasive. Generally, the tension on orthodontic appliances, which is generated by the orthodontic treatments initially feels unpleasant.

7. Who bears the cost of orthodontic treatment?

The issue of costs must be separately clarified in each individual case before the start of treatment. General information cannot be given. Basically, only very few orthodontic treatments are covered by compulsory health insurance (KVG). Private supplementary health insurances provide limited cover, especially if there has been no pre-existing condition or children have been insured up to a certain age. Serious cases are covered by disability insurance (IV), but only up to the patient's age of 20. Here, too, clarification must always be undertaken in individual cases.

8. What happens at the end of orthodontic treatment?

At the end of any orthodontic treatment so-called retention occurs. Retention is a phase of stabilisation during which the teeth are held in their new position. This comes in the form of orthodontic appliances, such as a retainer on the lingual (tongue) side or plates. The retention phase takes different lengths of time. Nowadays, the tendency in practice and science is for long retention phases.